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“If you are not afraid, you will not get infected.” Quarantine rolled back in Azerbaijan – what do people think?

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World Nomad Games Moved To 2021 Due To Pandemic

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World Nomad Games Moved To 2021 Due To Pandemic

Turkish authorities have moved the Fourth World Nomad Games to 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic.
The games, an international competition dedicated to ethnic sports, were scheduled to be held in the Turkish city of Bursa in autumn this year.
The President of the Turkey-based World Ethnosport Confederation, Bilal Erdogan, said on July 9 that the decision was made after consultations with Turkey's Foreign Ministry, Ministry of Youth and Sports, and Health Ministry to prevent a surge in coronavirus cases.

Kyrgyzstan’s Hills Come Alive With The Sound Of Nomads
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Kyrgyzstan’s Hills Come Alive With The Sound Of Nomads

RFE/RL’s photographer was on hand to capture the hoof-thumping action as the mountain venue of Kyrgyzstan’s Nomad Games opened on September 3.

The World Nomad Games were initiated by Kyrgyzstan and held for the first time in the Central Asian nation in 2014.

The second and third World Nomad Games were also held in Kyrgyzstan's picturesque northern region of Issyk-Kul in 2016 and 2018.

The nomad games include horse racing, archery, mounted archery, falconry, and different types of wrestling, including wrestling from horseback.
The games have gained in popularity, prompting teams representing Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, the Philippines, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Russia, and even the United States to regularly attend the event.

The last World Nomad Games in 2018 hosted athletes from 66 countries, including several European nations, such as Austria, Belarus, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, France, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Switzerland, and Ukraine.
This year, for the first time, the games were scheduled to be held outside of Kyrgyzstan.

With reporting by Anadolu, TRT Haber, and Yeni Safak

Read Original Article here by RFERL

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Women in politics, army without the coronavirus, summer without tourists – “Past week in the Caucasus” from JAMnews, video

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Surveillance cameras brought in to monitor quarantine regs in Baku

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Baku is adding street surveillance cameras to the methods at its disposal to monitor violations of the strict quarantine measures in place in the city.

The quarantine measures were reintroduced on June 21, and will last at least until July 20 due to an increased number of infections in the country. On July 2, 572 new infections were reported in a single day.

The authorities say are trying to better enforce the quarantine regulations for the sake of the population, however many in the public are afraid that the bans in place will only become stricter.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, 18,684 people have been infected in Azerbaijan. Of these, 228 have died and 10,425 have recovered.

The new system is being introduced after police posts were removed from the streets to check whether people had SMS permission to have left the house – this system led to enormous traffic jams.

The SMS exit system was implemented in the beginning of the pandemic, and has been in and out of force in the past two months as Azerbaijan has grappled with a drastic rise in infections.

From now on, cars will be checked at random, and the traffic police intends to use the cameras to check whether drivers have permission to be outside.

It has not yet been specified how this system will work.

On social media, people express mainly a sense of bewilderment over the new measures, especially the role of surveillance cameras.

“If I go to the doctor’s appointment and the appointment is delayed for more than two hours – how will the camera check the doctor’s certificate?”

“They will install a chip in us and check whether we have permission for two hours or not?”

“And what if there are 5 people in the car, and only the driver has permission?”

Many residents of Baku are afraid that the authorities may again forbid them to leave their homes on weekends, as has already been done twice in June. Social media users have written much about this traumatic experience, including the inability to go out for two days even for medication or for urgent medical attention.

The post Surveillance cameras brought in to monitor quarantine regs in Baku appeared first on English Jamnews.

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